PM03 WHAT'S IMPORTANT TO PATIENTS? USING TOOLS FROM MARKETING AND EDUCATION TO ASSESS DISPARATE PERSPECTIVES AND IMPROVE DECISION SUPPORT TOOLS

Sunday, October 18, 2015: 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Mills Studio 6 (Hyatt Regency St. Louis at the Arch)

Course Type: Half Day
Course Level: Beginner

Overview: This course will address why it is important to understand what patients and healthcare providers value, and the need to improve how preferences are assessed and incorporated into decision making. We will present a basic overview of the strengths and limitations of commonly-used approaches for understanding what is important to patients and providers, including focus groups, values clarification approaches, utility assessment tools, and analytic hierarchical processes. We will spend most of the session introducing two methods for assessing preferences and affect: real-time response (affect trace) and cognitive mapping (nominal group technique and card sorting). We will describe these methods and their applications, including an interactive session with hands-on activities to ensure that participants can apply these tools in their own work. We will present an example of how information is collected using affect trace and how this process was used to inform physician assumptions and treatment options available to their patients and to help them understand patientsí fears, concerns, and biases. We will demonstrate how it was then applied to the development of a multimedia decision aid. We will describe how these findings affected the content, approach, voice and user design, and how the resulting decision aid was received by the second wave of patient focus group patients who reviewed it. Course Objectives: 1) To identify and recognize differences in perspectives on multidisciplinary teams, and learn approaches to arriving at a shared point of view; 2) To describe Nominal Group Technique to elicit and prioritize preferences; 3) To describe Moment-to-Moment Affect Trace to assess and measure preferences and affect; 4) To apply advanced data mining techniques to reveal underlying patterns of response in the moment-to-moment affect rating data that otherwise could not be detected using traditional demographics; 5) To illustrate how findings from preference elicitation techniques can be incorporated to improve decision aids and to improve provider understanding of patient concerns and communication.

Background: When developing patient decision aids, a multidisciplinary team that extends beyond a single medical specialty is often needed to advise on the content, framing, and range of treatment options. While this provides key perspectives, incorporating disparate opinions regarding what is important to patients or providers is one of the most fundamental challenges of decision aid development. Different healthcare providers encounter patients at different points in their journey when patients may have different concerns, priorities, and symptoms. And patients can be a dubious source of what they think they need to know. The tools decision analysts use to assess patient preferences and values differ from those used by marketers and educators. While the need for assessing patient preferences is gaining increasing acceptance, there are limitations to the methods commonly used to assess preferences.

Format Requirements: This interactive course will include lecture, demonstrations and interactive class exercises. During the session, participants will participate in interactive exercises that: 1) demonstrate the use of Nominal Group Technique to assess and prioritize values, and affect trace to assess the emotions of class participants; 2) apply knowledge gained by designing a preference assessment tool for a clinical topic; and 3) apply findings from exercises to the design or roll-out of a decision aid. Participants are assumed to be familiar with the general concepts of medical decision making, and to be interested in their application to developing, testing, and integrating decision aids into clinical practice. Beginners are welcome, as are those with more advanced skills in the area. No special computer expertise is required.

Description and Objectives: This course will address why it is important to understand what patients and healthcare providers value and the need to improve how preferences are assessed and incorporated into decision making. We will review of the strengths and limitations of commonly-used approaches for understanding what is important to patients and providers, including focus groups, values clarification approaches, utility assessment tools, and analytic hierarchical processes. We will spend most of the session introducing two methods for assessing preferences and affect: real-time response (affect trace) and cognitive mapping  (nominal group technique and card sorting). We will describe these methods and their applications, including an interactive session with hands-on activities to ensure that participants can apply these tools in their own work.

We will present an example of how information is collected using affect trace, and how this process was used to inform physician assumptions and treatment options available to their patients and to help them understand patients’ fears, concerns, and biases. We will demonstrate how it was applied to developing a multimedia decision aid. We will describe how these findings guided the content, approach, voice and user design, and how the resulting decision aid was received by the second wave of focus group patients who reviewed it.

Course Objectives:

1) Identify and recognize differences in perspectives on multidisciplinary teams, and learn approaches to arrive at a shared perspective.

2) Describe Nominal Group Technique to elicit and prioritize preferences.

3) Describe Moment-to-Moment Affect Trace to assess and measure preferences and affect;

4) Apply advanced data mining techniques to reveal underlying patterns of response in the moment-to-moment affect rating data that otherwise could not be detected using traditional demographics;

5) Illustrate how findings from preference elicitation techniques can be incorporated to improve decision aids and to improve provider understanding of patient concerns and communication.

Course Director:

Nananda F. Col, MD, MPH, MPP, FACP
Shared Decision Making Resources
Principal
College of Osteopathic Medicine and Center of Excellence in Neuroscience

Nananda Col, MD, MPP, MPH, FACP, is a general internist and decision scientist whose primary interest is developing new approaches to help patients and health care providers make decisions that reflect their personal circumstances, characteristics, goals, and preferences. Her work developing evidence-based, patient-centered shared decision making applications bridges the divide between decision sciences, risk communication, and medical informatics. With over 20 years experience as a primary care internist and NIH-funded health services researcher, her scholarly work addresses a broad range of issues relevant to clinical decision making, women's health, and consumer health informatics. She serves on the Steering Committee for the International Patient Decision Aid Standards collaboration and the Cochrane Collaboration's Review of Patient Decision Aids, the FDA's Risk Communication Advisory Committee, and several study sections, including the NIH (Healthcare Delivery and Methodologies) and Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute.

Course Faculty:

Geri Baumblatt, BA, MA
Emmi Solutions
Executive Director of Patient Engagement

Geri Lynn Baumblatt, MA, is the Executive Director of Patient Engagement at Emmi Solutions where for the past 12 years she has worked with clinicians, decision scientists, overseen the creation of multimedia patient engagement, education, shared decision-making, and behavior change programs and interactive phone calls. She hosts an annual October Health Literacy Month blog series. She regularly speaks and serves on health literacy and shared decision making panels for organizations like AHRQ, ICCH, SMDM, the Institute for Healthcare Advancement, the Beryl Institute, the Health Sector Advisory Council at Duke University, Stanford Medicine X, The Population Health Colloquium, HCEA, and the Center for Plain Language. She also serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Patient Experience.

Jan Gollins, MBA
DePaul University
Adjunct Professor of Marketing

Mr.JanR.Gollins, MBA Mr. Gollins is principal & founder of the Delta Modelling Group. Delta provides predictive models,forecasting, trade promotion analytics, advanced data analysis and consumer research services to leading CPG and pharmaceutical companies. He is a marketing science executive recognized for pioneering many of the widely accepted analytical techniques used by CPG companies for analyzing electronic POS scanning and consumer household purchasing data. His international experience includes living in the UK and working extensively in Europe, Asia and South Africa. His research in the application and use of moment-to-moment affect trace methodology has been used in nationally televised Presidential Debates, television pilot testing, TV ad copy testing and virtual moment-tomoment focus groups. Mr. Gollins holds adjunct faculty positions teaching multivariate data analysis at three leading Universities in Chicago. Mr. Gollins is the 2013 recipient of DePaul Universityís, Distinguished Professional Educator Award, The Kellstadt Marketing Center. He is President Emeritus of DePaulís Marketing Advisory Council. Mr. Gollins is a Lecturer at the University of Chicago and an adjunct professor of marketing at Loyola University. Mr. Gollins is a board member of the Chicago Chapter of The American Statistical Association.

Danielle Walls, MA
BDJ Solutions, Inc.
Director of Research

Danielle M. Walls, MA Danielle Walls is co-founder of BDJ Solutions, a custom market research consulting company. She has more than 10 yearsí experience in the market research field specializing in the health and pharmaceutical sectors. She has a masterís degree in political science from The Ohio State University.